Weekly Photo Challenge: Victory

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Victory.”

Canon on board HMS Victory, Nelsons 104-gun flagship which won the Battle of Trafalgar
Canon on board HMS Victory, Nelsons 104-gun flagship of a fleet which won the Battle of Trafalgar

HMS Victory was Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson’s flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Built in 1758, she is the world’s oldest naval ship still in commission and is one of the most visited museum ships moored at Portsmouth, England, where I took these photos.

Sleeping quarter onboard HMS Victory
Able seaman bunks onboard HMS Victory
Officer's Uniform displayed onboard HMS Victory
Officer’s Uniform displayed onboard HMS Victory
Nelson's Column guarded by Lions in Trafalgar Square, London
Nelson’s Column guarded by Lions in Trafalgar Square, London

27 British ships led by Nelson onboard The Victory, defeated 33 French and Spanish ships under French Admiral Villeneuve just west of Cape Trafalgar, Atlantic.

The Franco-Spanish fleet lost 22 ships, without a single British vessel being lost. The British victory spectacularly confirmed the naval supremacy that Britain had established during the 18th Century and was mainly achieved because of Nelson’s new style of naval tactics.

HMS Victory is one of the most visited museum ships moored at Portsmouth Historical Dockyard www.historicdockyard.co.uk
HMS Victory is one of the most visited museum ships moored at Portsmouth Historical Dockyard
Plaque on the part of the Deck where Nelson Fell at Trafalgar despite winning the battle.
Plaque on the exact part of the deck where Nelson Fell despite winning the Battle of Trafalgar.

Nelson was shot by a French musketeer during this battle and died shortly after.

To this day Nelson is regarded as one of Britain’s greatest war heroes and his statue on tall pilar stands in London’s Trafalgar Square.

To visit Portsmouth’s Historical Dockyard visit http://www.historicdockyard.co.uk

Further photos I took accompany my poem ‘Portsmouth’:  https://southamptonoldlady.wordpress.com/2015/10/28/portsmouth/

Portsmouth

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Good Morrow Old Pompey! 

How the Dickens thee be?

Southampton stops by this fine Summer’s day.

After cash-jab and face-lift, looks young and healthy

I calls on thee ‘Neighbour’,

but ‘Scummer!’ ye names me 

Thee Royal Navy and I Merchant Sea

Yet ye stole my ferry passengers

And should-be-mine bananas fatten your docks

I sings out: “Daylight Come and I Want go home”.

“What Shall We do with a Drunken Sailor?” is your repost

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Come jolly Jack Tar

slap my back if I slaps thine

Chants we more o’them shanties

and buy me a bevvy

at Spice Island Tavern

we’ll sup to “fair ladies”

my Queens and Princesses

your grand Ark Royals

and here’s to Lord Admiral Nelson

and his flagged Victory.

Your rum and brandy, my wine and beer

We feast on mackerel – all sprightly silver,

 like 30 pieces, or was that of eight?

Lament our great losses:

My tragic Titanic

Your dear Mary Rose. 

Evoke Dunkirk spirit –

How we did save them

by the thousand

How we did fight them

shoulder to shoulder

against the French, and on D-Day, the Blitz …

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Let’s parade to bagpipes along your old battlements

Lungs refresh’d

with Southsea salt-air,

We skiff English pebbles

aim for Spitbank

and against that greasy-grey grave of great sea.

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Thee, and thy gulls, have welcomed me 

And now I must bid fare-thee-well and Adieu..

Let’s stay always Mateys

And repay my Southampton a visit

real soon.

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Note: I wrote this after visiting friends in Portsmouth, about half an hour’s ride away. Historically Southampton and Portsmouth have always been rival ports. It is only heard in football match chants nowadays. But the two cities have always pulled together hard against common enemies.