Halloween Challenge – Graveyards

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The Italian boy who drowned in 1921 (now headless)
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Mario’s grave
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The grave with the tree growing on it
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The tomb that slides open
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Lean on each other
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nettles amongst the headstones

Part of JNWS Halloween challenge: Graveyards

All these photos were taken at Southampton Common Old Cemetery, England. © Southampton Old Lady

You might also be interested in my other posts about this cemetery:

Titanic Graves at the Old Cemetery

The Weed Fighter

Killed by Lightening

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Amazing People 4: The Weed Fighter

Edwina clearing weeds away from grave stones at Southampton Old Cemetery on the Common.
Edwina clearing weeds away from grave stones at Southampton Old Cemetery on the Common

Edwina lives in a small flat not far from The Old Cemetery on Southampton Common. She loves gardening but has no garden of her own. Every week she comes here with her gardening gloves and secateurs to spend the day clearing weeds away from these ancient grave stones. The Cemetery is over-run with weeds, the worst of which to tackle is ivy. Edwina does not belong to the official team of “Friends” (www.fosoc.org), who tidy up the paths etc. nor organisations that clear up the stones of Titanic victims and the famous. She clears up the lost ones that she thinks would benefit from her help. She gets neither pay nor thanks from anyone as no-one even knows she does this task.  So on this ‘Day of the Dead’, I would like to say thank you Edwina – you are amazing!

(Extra)ordinary: Down-pipe

19th Century English Gothic Revival down-pipe
19th Century English Gothic Revival down-pipe

There are so many old buildings in England that the everyday things attached to them get over-looked. Can you imagine the work that went into this down-pipe (drain, dust-pipe) that enabled it to match the English Gothic Revival architecture of the 1800s and stand the test of time? If I displayed a photo of the building that it is attached to, it would sink back to oblivion.

In response to Weekly Photo Challenge: (Extra)ordinary – Mundane and meaningful objects. Beautiful everyday things. 

To Participate: <a href=”https://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/extraordinary/”>(Extra)ordinary</a&gt;

Okay then here’s a small photo of the back of the building:

Highclere Castle

Sir Bevis – Hero of Southampton

Josian & The Lions from the Hours of England illuminations.
Josian & The Lions from the Hours of England illuminations.
Southampton Bargate, the city's gatehouse and a remnant of the Medieval wall that surrounds the city centre of Southampton. Legend has it that Sr Bevois Earl of Southampton was its founder. The bronze lions (in honour of Josian) replaced the wooden ones in 1743.
Southampton Bargate, the city’s gatehouse and a remnant of the Medieval wall that surrounds the city centre of Southampton. Legend has it that Sr Bevois Earl of Southampton was its founder. The bronze lions (in honour of Josian) replaced the wooden ones in 1743.

beviscover2Place names are all over Southampton with characters from the Bevis legend: Bevis (a slave turned hero), Josian (the independant Princess) the Lions and the giant Ascupart.

Lynn Forest-Hill is launching her new book Bevis of Hampton as a ‘limited festival edition’ for Southampton’s first literary festival SO: To Speak, which takes place in October 2015.

I am so looking forward reading this translation of the story of Sir Bevis (Hero of Southampton) from Middle English into modern English. I had a sneak preview when I was shown a few of the pages for layout purposes. It has excellent explanatory notes under each page of text. Lynn Forest-Hill is a literary scholar specializing in Medievalism, she is a Fellow of the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Culture at the University of Southampton and is the Education Officer for the Tolkien Society.

This is a Southampton brass coin I have. It was used as a token with the head of Sir Bevois
This is a Southampton brass coin I have. It was used as a token with the head of Sir Bevois

Lynn has written multiple papers regarding J.R.R. Tolkien’s works and her research has been used in articles featured in the Times Literary Supplement. For the last nine years, She has been leading three local reading groups; one studies Shakespeare’s work and the other two focus on the examination of poetry.
I have been following her research on this book on her blog, where she has wonderful links to this legend including a film and even one on how middle english sounds: https://bevisofhampton.wordpress.com
so to speak roundFor more about the SO: To Speak festival:

http://www.sotospeakfestival.org

For more about the legend of Bevis and the Romance poem:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bevis_of_Hampton   +

http://www.tudorrevels.co.uk/articles.php?itemId=58

The Book of Hours forms part of the British Library Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts.
To view the illuminations:

English doors

Who would live in a place like this? © southampton old lady
Who would live in a place like this?
© southampton old lady

I love English doors. I have been taking snaps of people’s doors in Southampton. This has aroused suspicion in passers by. They must wonder if I am an estate agent, a reporter or a thief!  Then today this wonderful blogger I follow, ‘Katka on the shore’ got there before me and has posted some great photos of beautiful English doors. Check out her site:

http://katkaontheshore.com/2015/08/06/these-doors/