Trio: Train seats

WordPress Photo Challenge: TRIO
To take part visit: https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/trio/

Trio of seats on a train to Southampton Central station. Worn and cosy. I am obsessed with chairs and this did not fit into my sign, chair door series.
Trio of seats on a train to Southampton Central station. Worn and cosy. I am obsessed with chairs and this did not fit into my sign, chair door series.

 

Part of the WordPress challenge: Trio

 

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Victory

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Victory.”

Canon on board HMS Victory, Nelsons 104-gun flagship which won the Battle of Trafalgar
Canon on board HMS Victory, Nelsons 104-gun flagship of a fleet which won the Battle of Trafalgar

HMS Victory was Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson’s flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Built in 1758, she is the world’s oldest naval ship still in commission and is one of the most visited museum ships moored at Portsmouth, England, where I took these photos.

Sleeping quarter onboard HMS Victory
Able seaman bunks onboard HMS Victory
Officer's Uniform displayed onboard HMS Victory
Officer’s Uniform displayed onboard HMS Victory
Nelson's Column guarded by Lions in Trafalgar Square, London
Nelson’s Column guarded by Lions in Trafalgar Square, London

27 British ships led by Nelson onboard The Victory, defeated 33 French and Spanish ships under French Admiral Villeneuve just west of Cape Trafalgar, Atlantic.

The Franco-Spanish fleet lost 22 ships, without a single British vessel being lost. The British victory spectacularly confirmed the naval supremacy that Britain had established during the 18th Century and was mainly achieved because of Nelson’s new style of naval tactics.

HMS Victory is one of the most visited museum ships moored at Portsmouth Historical Dockyard www.historicdockyard.co.uk
HMS Victory is one of the most visited museum ships moored at Portsmouth Historical Dockyard
Plaque on the part of the Deck where Nelson Fell at Trafalgar despite winning the battle.
Plaque on the exact part of the deck where Nelson Fell despite winning the Battle of Trafalgar.

Nelson was shot by a French musketeer during this battle and died shortly after.

To this day Nelson is regarded as one of Britain’s greatest war heroes and his statue on tall pilar stands in London’s Trafalgar Square.

To visit Portsmouth’s Historical Dockyard visit http://www.historicdockyard.co.uk

Further photos I took accompany my poem ‘Portsmouth’:  https://southamptonoldlady.wordpress.com/2015/10/28/portsmouth/

Study reveals most people in Southampton count people living close to them as friends

Reblogged from http://www.dailyecho.co.uk article published Monday 23 February 2015


Alma Road is at the forefront of showing how neighbours can be there for one another.
Alma Road is at the forefront of showing how neighbours can be there for one another (Echo).

It is a city brimming with community spirit where neighbours become friends.

That’s the findings of a survey released today that has Southampton topping the charts when it comes to the most “neighbourly” city in the UK.

The research – carried out to mark the start of Love Your Neighbour Week – revealed how 90 per cent of people who were asked said they would count people who live close to them as friends.

One area in Southampton where there is real community spirit between neighbours is the Outer Avenue in Bevois Valley.

With its mixture of long-term residents and newly-moved in students in Avenue Road, Alma Road, Gordon Avenue and Earls Road, Outer Avenue Residents Association (OARA) has been at the forefront of showing how neighbours can be there for one another.

The group hold regular litter picks, parties to welcome students to the area, a cherry planting programme, table top sales and even have a wheelie bin management system.

They also rallied round to help a student who was assaulted in Portswood and bought him chocolates and a card, another example was when they brought tyres to help a resident whose car was vandalised.

Chairman of OARA, John Hayward, said: “It is good to reach out and get on with your neighbours for the common good.”

“From a personal point of view it makes a big difference, my wife and I have got to know lots of people we would have never met.

“It is nice to walk around and see the students clean and seethe planting going on and to feel like you are supporting each other.”

The survey was carried out by chocolatiers, Lily O’Brien’s and saw 5,000 people polled.

Des Hayward, 66, retired from Avenue Road, said: “We have grouped together because we wanted to have a community rather than being transient. We live here and we love the area and we wanted it to be a nice area to live in.”

Fiona Barnes,57, administrator from Avenue Road, said: “It has always been a friendly area here. We moved away in 1987 and moved back nine months later.

“People look after one another and I like the fact that even if you do not know someone’s name people say hello to each other.”


My photo of of Alma Road, Bevois Town, Southampton.
My photo of of Alma Road, Bevois Town, Southampton
Any season is street party season in Alma Road.
Any season is street party season in Alma Road.

Movember

Christian with moustache in Southampton
Christian with moustache in Southampton

Correct me if I’m wrong readers, but I think that the concept of Movember started in Sydney, Australia in 2004. An amalgamation of Moustache and November, Movember is a concept whereby a moustache is grown for the month of November to highlight men’s health issues. It has caught on throughout Europe now.

Regency-styles for men, including sideburns or beards are especially fashionable where I live in Southern England. I really like them.

Bar tender from The Rockstone Pub
Kiwi, from The Rockstone Pub
These guys are regular contenders at The Rockstone
These guys are regular contenders at The Rockstone

Each year I go to The Rockstone, a pub run by youngsters in Southampton. It holds some ‘jolly’ Beard Off competitions.  By doing so, money is raised for charities dealing with prostate cancer awareness among other issues. They will be celebrating their 4th this month.

The Rockstone Pub holds an annual Beard Off
The Rockstone Pub holds an annual Beard Off
The Lounge Kittens - musicians at The Rockstone
The Lounge Kittens – musicians at The Rockstone

Many pub landlords seem to adorn facial hair these retro-loving days.

Landlord of The Butcher's Hook micro-brewery, Southampton
Landlord of The Butcher’s Hook micro-brewery, Southampton

Stick-on moustaches are usually around in the shops in November for those unable to grow their own – usually children and women.

Stick on moustaches are popular
Stick on moustaches are popular

However in the last few years Movember has even prompted women, prone to excess hair growth for their sex, to grow moustaches and even beards for the month. I think they also look amazing.

Harnaam (above) and Siobhain (below) went on TV to highlight women's hair-growth last year.
Harnaam (above) and Siobhain (below) went on TV to highlight women’s hair-growth last year.

Siobhain-Fletcher

I myself draw on a Duchamp-style line with an eye-brown pencil while looking in the pub mirror, but not until I’ve had a few beers.

Goodwood Gaggers at the Regency Ball
Goodwood Gaggers at the Regency Ball
Tony the actor
Tony the actor, Goodwood Regency Ball
Dave Tart the Poet at East Street Arts Festival, Southampton
Dave Tart the Poet at East Street Arts Festival, Southampton
Seamus the Postie
Seamus the Postie, Southampton
James the boffin
James the boffin, Southampton

 

 

Two Minutes Silence

eleventh hour, eleventh day, eleventh month …

Belgian Soldiers War Graves, some of the many nationalities of soldiers buried at Southampton Common Old Cemetery.
Belgian Soldiers WW1 Graves, some of the many nationalities of soldiers buried at Southampton Common Old Cemetery if they did not get lost on the field.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them …

From For the Fallen by Laurence Binyon

Remembrance

Poppies

Watts Park leaves fall softly from tall sycamores

fluttering like wounded birds

perch briefly on broad-shouldered uniform

before landing on sodden ground

conkers and grass compressed in to mud

by platoons of polished black boots

Remembrance poppies

Our Civic Centre clock chimes:

‘O God our help in ages past

Our hope for years to come…’

Bishop of Southampton delivers solomn sermon,

and there’s poppies, poppies, poppies…

But my thoughts slip away to you dear Father

medals

I have recycled your values

composting leaves, endlessly reprocessing

The earth reminds me of your grave.

I think of battle fields

bomb craters and dugouts became giant puddles

and there’s soldiers, soldiers, soldiers

Who would volunteer to become a soldier?

You did dear Father

Lied about your age so you could enlist

to join your regiment of pals

blasting out ‘Reveille’ or ‘The Last Post’ on your bugle

marching bravely in your correct-angled beret

through streets of England and Malta

through deserts of Egypt and Burma

over mountains in India and Italy

for Crown and Country

for your neighbours and family

for us that we may live in hope of peace

Southampton Cenotaph

November 11th,  2013

Death on the Line (Ghosts in Southampton)

Eric Jones-Evans was a medical practitioner and actor. He maintained a medical practice in Fawley, near Southampton, and closed his surgery on matinee days to perform at the Grand Theatre in Southampton. In 1928 he formed his own company and both wrote and appeared in a number of his own melodramas, chiefly adapted from the novels of Charles Dickens and George Eliot.

A performance of Death on the Line: A Ghost Story in One Act

Among the papers of Dr Eric Jones-Evans is a typescript of Death on the Line: A Ghost Story in One Act. Based on Dickens’ short story The Signal Man, the play is set in a signal-box in a deep cutting near a tunnel entrance on a lonely stretch of the railway line. The author describes it as a play of “atmosphere and tension”, with the wailing of the wind in the telegraph wires introduced judicially to provide an eerie background to the narrative. It tells the story of a railway signalman who is haunted by a recurring apparition, with each appearance of the spectre preceding a tragic event on the railway. The first is followed by a terrible collision between two trains in the tunnel (likely based on the Clayton Tunnel crash of 1861) and the second by the mysterious death of a young woman on a passing train. The third and final warning of “death on the line” causes the signalman to rush onto the track in an attempt to stop an oncoming train where he is struck and killed. As the driver and other characters stand over his body a telegram is received warning of fallen rocks on the line up ahead. The play ends as they ponder how he could have known and how many lives might have been lost if not for his intervention.

Death on the line was reblogged from the University of Southampton Special Posts “Ghosts in the archive” https://wordpress.com/read/post/id/62458727/1629 (for the play typescript itself: MS 91)

The Grand Theatre in West Marlands Southampton, Opposite the Civic Centre before WW2 Blitz
The Grand Theatre in West Marlands Southampton, Opposite the Civic Centre before WW2 Blitz
Today stands a new row of shops after Grand Theatre was flattened by bombs.
Today in its place stands a new row of shops opposite Marlands Poundworld.
Train line at Six Dials, Northam, during Southampton Blitz
Train line at Six Dials, Northam, during Southampton Blitz

 

 

 

 

 

For more about  Southampton Blitz see my search engine or  go to the website below:

https://southamptonoldlady.wordpress.com/2015/07/14/southampton-blitz/

 

Amazing People 4: The Weed Fighter

Edwina clearing weeds away from grave stones at Southampton Old Cemetery on the Common.
Edwina clearing weeds away from grave stones at Southampton Old Cemetery on the Common

Edwina lives in a small flat not far from The Old Cemetery on Southampton Common. She loves gardening but has no garden of her own. Every week she comes here with her gardening gloves and secateurs to spend the day clearing weeds away from these ancient grave stones. The Cemetery is over-run with weeds, the worst of which to tackle is ivy. Edwina does not belong to the official team of “Friends” (www.fosoc.org), who tidy up the paths etc. nor organisations that clear up the stones of Titanic victims and the famous. She clears up the lost ones that she thinks would benefit from her help. She gets neither pay nor thanks from anyone as no-one even knows she does this task.  So on this ‘Day of the Dead’, I would like to say thank you Edwina – you are amazing!